The kudzu bug or bean plataspid feeds on kudzu and soybeans

The kudzu bug, or bean plataspid, feeds on kudzu and soybeans.

What happened to the kudzu bug in Georgia this year?

If the southeastern part of the United States experiences a winter without abnormally low temperatures like we had last winter, then we will likely see kudzu bug numbers return to relatively high numbers next spring, says UGA entomologist.

A widespread soybean pest the past five years, kudzu bug populations in Georgia this year are nowhere near what they have been in previous years.

“This has been a pleasant surprise to most soybean farmers in Georgia,” said Michael Toews, University of Georgia research entomologist.

Kudzu bugs, or “Megacopta cribraria,” have green-to-brown bodies, stippled wing covers and wide back ends. A member of the stink bug family, they can be confused with brown marmorated stink bugs or lady beetles. They also feed on Georgia’s most famous weed, kudzu, and other legumes. They are most active in the spring.

Wayne Gardner, a UGA entomologist and scientist based on the Griffin campus, attributes the drop in kudzu bug numbers this year to the abnormal winter cold snap that swept through the southeastern United States last year.

"If the southeastern part of the United States experiences a winter without abnormally low temperatures like we had last winter, then we will likely see kudzu bug numbers return to relatively high numbers next spring," said Gardner who began his study of the pest when it initially arrived in northeast Georgia in October 2009.

If the southeastern part of the country experiences a normal winter in the upcoming months, higher kudzu bug populations are likely to return next spring, Gardner said.

While temperatures played a role in reducing kudzu bug populations, a tiny wasp helped, too. Native to Asia, these parasitic wasps are natural predators to kudzu bugs. The wasp lays its egg in kudzu bug’s egg; then, the developing wasp larva destroy the kudzu bug egg as it develops.

The U.S. discovery of these wasps over the last two years led to the hypothesis that the decline in kudzu bugs is due to the wasps’ arrival. There have been numerous sightings of the wasp over the past couple of weeks. Last year, the wasp was found in the same area as the kudzu bug on initial discovery, Toews said. Now, the wasp has been spotted in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. It will take a couple of years for scientists to determine the definitive reason for the decrease in the kudzu bug population.

No spray this year

When prevalent and untreated, kudzu bugs can have a devastating impact on soybeans, a crop worth $126.6 million in Georgia. Kudzu bugs are sucking insects that feed on the plant’s sap, which weakens and stresses the plant. The stress can result in yield loss.

“On average, in trials we’ve conducted in previous years, our yield loss averages 19 percent where we’ve failed to treat kudzu bugs,” said Phillip Roberts, a UGA Extension entomologist based in Tifton.

In past years, one to two insecticide applications have been needed to control kudzu bugs; but, this year most farmers haven’t had to spray at all.

TAGS: Management
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